It will come as no surprise that in light of Spain’s woes, capital has been leaving Spanish banks in droves. In July 5% of the country’s entire asset base (€74 billion) left the country. That’s over 17% in just over a year. The most likely place for those banks to come up with the cash has been selling sovereign bonds. The question remains has this prompted Draghi in recent weeks to make comments about doing “what it takes”.

A need to raise cash to meet those withdrawals may have prompted the recent bond sales, as other assets owned by banks – mainly loans and mortgages – are far less liquid. Spanish bank bond holdings are dominated by Spanish government debt, but also include those of other countries.

So where does this leave Mario Draghi? While Spanish banks are selling SPGBs, Spain has 8 bonds auctions planned in the next 6 weeks. Draghi is under serious pressure to get aggreement on a sovereign bond buying scheme. 

…..while Mario Draghi is furiously trying to come up with a bond buying plan that is endorsed by Germany, Buba and Weidmann, all of whom have, to date, said, “9-9-9”, regardless of what the final construct is, whether it includes the ECM, EFSF, and/or ECB buying bonds directly, the key distinction is that no monetary authority can buy bonds in the primary market, as that is a direct breach of Article 123/125, and absent a thorough revision of the Maastricht Treaty, investors will dump as soon as the ECB starts breaking the rules unilaterally. Certainly bonds can be monetized in the secondary market, but someone has to buy them from the government. And if Spanish banks are unable to stem the deposit outflow, there is simply no practical possibility for banks to be buying SPGBs in the primary market even as they are forced to dump them in the secondary market.

In other words, the ECB may or may not surprise next week, but unless the Spanish public is convinced its banks are safe, and the remaining EUR1.5 trillion in Spanish deposits do not explicitly remain within the Spanish bank system, anything Draghi does will be for nothing.

As for next year, the requirement to sell even more SPGBs increases by 40% on this year while competing with Spanish banks dumping bonds. The monster continues to grow. We already know from Mark Grant that Spain’s real debt/GDP figure is closer to 134%.

All in all, the total amount of gross bond issuance from Spain in 2013 could be in excess of EUR 120bn. That is around 40% higher than this year, 10-20% higher than in 2009 and almost four times larger than the average amount of Spanish bond issuance recorded in the previous four years.

 As far as another LTRO, its unlikey to suceed as Spain is fresh out of collateral.

…and the inevitable LTRO X, which the ECB will have to do in order to provide additional funding to Spain, which unlike before, however, will no longer work as Spain and the rest of Europe, are out of eligible collateral, meaning the ECB will have to get the Buba to agree to even more last minute rule changes to keep Spain “solvent.”

So, the pressure is on Draghi to push through with his Bond Purchase Plan. In fact it has been reported that he has number of options but rushing it through by giving only 24 hours to digest it before debating a solution. Serious pressure!

Sept. 1 (Bloomberg) — The euro area’s 17 national central bank governors will have about 24 hours to digest European Central Bank President Mario Draghi’s bond-buying proposal before they start debating it, three officials said.

The ECB’s Executive Board will send a list of options for the bond-buying program to the governors on Sept. 4, a day before the Governing Council convenes in Frankfurt, the central bank officials said yesterday on condition of anonymity because the plans aren’t public. The meeting concludes on Sept. 6, after which Draghi holds his regular press conference. No single policy option has emerged as preeminent, the officials said. An ECB spokesman declined to comment.

The lack of a clear preference, the complexity of the issue and the shortage of time increase the risk that Draghi won’t present a detailed plan next week, according to economists at Commerzbank AG and JPMorgan Chase & Co. The ECB may choose to hold back some details of the plan until the German Constitutional Court rules on the legality of Europe’s permanent bailout fund on Sept. 12, two of the officials said.

The battle between Draghi and Weidmann of Buba is a serious roadblock for the ECB’s plans. Another resignation from the Bundesbank would apply pressure to Merkel and with elections coming up next year and an ever ailing economy, Merkel and Germany has little room for manoeuver for backing the ECB’s Bond Purchasing Scheme. Best of luck Draghi 😉 

Mr Weidmann, the only ECB council member opposed to ECB president Mario Draghi‘s plan to buy bonds in some shape or form, has decided to remain in his post to defend his position at next week’s policy meeting, ‘Bild’ reported. The second resignation of a Bundesbank boss in as many years would send shockwaves through the markets and make it much more difficult for Chancellor Angela Merkel to soften her stance towards bailouts for countries such as Ireland.

Her room for manoeuvre ahead of next year’s general election is already shrinking as the German economy rapidly slows down. The Bundesbank has repeatedly made clear that it has deep misgivings about the ECB’s determination to press ahead with such a scheme.

Mr Weidmann’s predecessor as Bundesbank chief, Axel Weber, quit last year in protest at the ECB’s previous, now-dormant bond-buy plan. Juergen Stark, a former ECB chief economist, followed him out of the door. Earlier this week, Mr Weidmann told ‘Der Spiegel‘ magazine that bond-buying can become “addictive”, like a drug.

He added: “I hardly believe that I am the only one to get stomachache over this.”

 
Source: Zero Hedge, San Francisco Chronicle, Irish Independent

Advertisements