With so much in the media lately regarding multinational corporations avoiding tax, is Bilderberg to propose a Global Tax to the G8 with Global governance to administrate? The Telegraph has already called for such a solution.

The cascade of revelations in recent months showing multinational companies doing a huge amount of business here and yet paying virtually no corporation tax has provoked widespread public demands for something to be done. But people tend to be rather hazier on what that “something” should be.

To define a solution we first need to grasp the nature of the problem: a global tax loophole. In our age of liberalised cross-border trade and free capital flows, multinational companies find themselves with a considerable level of freedom to choose where they pay tax on profits.

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The natural solution is to secure an agreement by all the world’s governments to tax the profits of multinational firms collectively and to divide up the revenues fairly between them. This division could be based on the amount of business done by the multinational in their various territories as revealed by their turnover and number of employees.

It sounds complicated, but American states have long operated a system designed along these lines known as “apportionment”. Another name used is “unitary taxation”. Those names are a bit of a turn-off to the layperson. What’s required is a reform banner that the general public can easily understand. I suggest: “Global Profit Tax”. After all, doesn’t it make sense that global companies should be compelled to pay global taxes?

I’m sure under this Hegelian dialect we will hear more of this proposed solution, but this implies that you need a Global Administration to ensure taxes are collected and distributed. The G8 meeting later in June will be closely watched.

Although happy to float such a revolutionary idea in the media in advance of back-to-back Google and Bilderberg summits at the Grove Hotel, and later at the G8, one thing which global taxation advocates fail to mention here is that if you institute a global taxation system then you would then need a global government to administrate it. Yes, you heard that right: global taxation = global government.

It would be naive to think that any tax could be levied without a government standing behind it. That is, after all, part of the definition of a tax. Campaigners will deny it exists, but the reality is that global governing bodies have already been put into place long ago.

UK Column Editor Mike Robinson explains, “I think that the embryonic global institutions are already in place, and we’re going to see them being given more and more real ‘jobs’ to do as time goes on, and collecting corporation tax is clearly going to be one of those”.

Post-Bilderberg: G8 Summit

Following the ratification of Bilderberg’s 2013 agenda in Watford on June 6–9th, the next step is normally to disseminate this same agenda on to the G8 heads of state. Conveniently, this year’s G8 summit will held June 17-18 at the Lough Erne golf resort in Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. David Cameron and George Osborne’s new plan for Google is already expected to be very high on the agenda at the G8 meeting, where world leaders including Barack Obama and Vladimir Putin will be in attendance. Henceforth, ahead of the G8, the UK government is expected to play their key role in promoting the new global tax system, by publically advocating, “new strong international standards to make sure that global companies pay the tax they owe.”

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Other recent attempts at a global tax

The financial component of this global tax and government equation is actually already in place, and that is the World Bank. The first administrative working model for a global taxation structure was originally unveiled in 2009 at the United Nations Climate Summit in Copenhagen. Delegates at that event floated their plan for a global carbon tax that would be collected and then deposited into a slush fund which was to be administered by the World Bank. There plan also entailed the poorer, developing nations footing most of the bill for this operation, while the wealthier nations would receive a free pass. The secret plan was thwarted at the last minute thanks to the infamous Danish Text Leak, which were serialized in the Guardian newspaper at the time.

Although popular in socialist circles, few have dared reveal the true picture of a global tax regime for fear of triggering a public backlash. Another such tax proposals have been pushed into the public sphere through the Occupy Movement in 2011, with called for a global tax on financial transactions, or a global “Robin Hood Tax”. As was the case in Copenhagen two years earlier, proponents called for a tax structure without borders, yet few dared mention who would be in charge of administering and distributing the revenues. Such plans pose the very real danger of further centralizing power into the international banking community who would be asked to handle and perhaps hypothecate on these enormous slush funds.

Which brings us back to this latest global ‘google tax’ proposal, which ultimately begs the question: when will their global government structure be unveiled?

Serving the global collective

Plans for erecting an entirely new global tax system should worry anyone who values the concept of national sovereignty because any solution that entails the collection of  tax by way of elite international “collective”  of nations, and where “revenues are to divided up fairly between them” is suggesting a form of global collectivism, or communism. This is also the fundamental problem with EU plans to levy new taxes on member nations – for any citizen it’s simply another master to serve.

Shocking as that may be, these issues are exactly what is being discussed behind closed doors at each of these global summits taking place in May and June of 2013.

What’s worse, is that this entire construct could be ushered in without any vote being cast by an citizen in the individual countries – which is about as undemocratic as it gets. This remains one of the fundamental flaws at the heart of the ultra-liberal utopian ideal which is global government.

Source: The TelegraphGlobalResearch.ca

 

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