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No Bank Collapses Before September?

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bail inThe Cyprus model of theft “bail-in” bank collapses is slowly being adopted globally as the solution to enable bankrupt sovereign nation states deal with bankrupt banks. Japan is the latest country to consider such a move, even the EU is about to adopt the policy, but all eyes will be on the G20 in September. It’s strongly suspected that the G20 will announce theft “bail-ins” as the solution to deal with bank collapses. That countries (New Zealand, EU, Canada, UK) have openly being discussing such a drastic solution shows there is expected to be a raft of banks collapsing in the near future.

I have been reporting for some time now that a number of central banks have already published policy documents detailing how bail-ins would work. The Bank of Canada, Bank of New Zealand, and the FDIC and Bank of England jointly, have all published something on the issue.

At its heart is the idea that savers are, in fact, “unsecured creditors” of the banks, and therefore come second only to shareholders should their assets need to be confiscated in order to keep a failed bank going for a little while longer.

Yesterday, Nikkei highlighted that Japan’s Financial Services Agency will enact new rules to force failed bank losses onto “investors”. 

The Japanese Parliament ratified the proposals yesterday.

Also yesterday, Sergei Storchak, a Russian Deputy Finance Minister stated that there would be a declaration by heads of state attending Septembers G20 meeting in St Petersberg which would bring an end to the policy of taxpayer bailouts. The implications of what he said was that the G20 would also be jumping on the bail-in policy instead.

The preparations for widespread confiscation of assets are nearly complete.

Source: UK Column, ZeroHedge

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Irish Finance Minister Noonan Proposes Bail In Policy

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Noonan's gesture to depositors

Noonan’s gesture to depositors

Under the presidency of the EU, the Irish finance minister Michael Noonan(2012 Bilderberg attendee) has proposed making the Cyprus theft “bail in” using deposits over €100k policy for future bank collapses. The BIS sets the banking agenda and they want depositors raped when banks collapse along with using “bail ins” to pay for bankers remuneration (big bonuses) according to a recent paper. Judging by the state of European banks, a lot of people are going to have their wealth wiped out and everyone will be at the same wealth level in the Orwellian EUSSR.

Deposits of over €100,000 are likely to be hit in the event of future European bank collapses, according to a proposal put forward by the Irish presidency of the European Council ahead of a key meeting of finance ministers next week.

Discussions on the controversial bank resolution regime, which is likely to see savers with deposits over €100,000 “bailed in” as part of future bank wind-downs, are due to intensify this week in Brussels, ahead of Tuesday’s meeting, which will be chaired by Minister for Finance, Michael Noonan.

“We will try to get some guidance from Ministers about the possible design of the bailout tool,” one EU official said yesterday.

Under a compromise text proposed by the Irish presidency, uninsured deposits of over €100,000 would be bailed in in the event that a bank is resolved, but depositors would rank higher than other creditors in the event of a wind-down.

In this scenario – known as “deposit preference” – depositors would rank at the very end of the process, with other creditors first absorbing losses.

However, some member states have not ruled out the possibility that insured deposits, i.e. deposits under €100,000, would be forced to bear losses in the event of a bank collapse even though these deposits would be likely to be protected by the deposit guarantee scheme.

However, the explicit exclusion of insured deposits from future “bail-ins” could in fact be included in the final text, according to some sources, with some MEPs in particular keen to include such a provision.

Significant differences still remain between states on the issue, with some countries calling for greater flexibility as regards the application of the new rules on a national basis, including the possibility that individual countries could be permitted to exempt large depositors from losses if a bank fails.

The introduction of an EU-wide bank resolution process, which would govern how banks are wound down, is a key strand of the EU’s plan for a pan-European banking union, which was endorsed by EU leaders at last June’s summit.

However, the chaotic Cyprus bailout instilled the issue with greater urgency, with EU lawmakers now keen to provide clarity around bank collapses.

Moving the burden
This year Jeroen Dijsselbloem, head of the group of 17 euro zone finance ministers, said that losses on bondholders and depositors could form part of future bank bailouts as euro zone officials seek to move the burden of bailouts away from taxpayers – as was the case in the Irish bailout – and on to private investors.

The European Commission argues that this switch from so-called “bailouts” to “bail-ins” would result in an allocation of losses that would not be worse than the losses that shareholders and creditors would have suffered in regular insolvency proceedings that apply to other private companies.

While the inclusion of large savers in future bank bailouts is now widely accepted, significant differences still remain between member states.

While the new rules governing bank resolution were first intended to come into place in 2018, since the Cypriot bailout there have been calls from senior EU figures such as European Central Bank president Mario Draghi and EU economics affairs commissioner Olli Rehn to introduce the new regime as early as 2015.

The Irish presidency of the European Council is hoping to reach a common position by the end of next month.

Noonan demonstrate how much you will be left with under the EU plan

Noonan demonstrates how much the EU/Banks intend you will be left with under the plan

 

 

 

 

Source: Irish Times, BIS

Solvenian Banks Close To Collapse

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After Cyprus, next up looks to be Slovenia. Over the weekend there has been an official denial that the banks are about to collapse and we know what that means. If it does turn out to be the case, then another  “bail in” would cause panic right across the Euro area.

 

SloveniaTYE2012Are Slovenian depositors about to get Cyprus’d with a wealth/deposit confiscation?  If the intensity of the denials by Slovenian officials are any indication, a bank crisis is imminent for the tiny balkan nation. 
New Prime Minister Alenka Bratusek attempted to calm Slovenians over the weekend stating: We are absolutely no Cyprus. We don’t need help. All we need is time.
If and when the 2nd bail-in episode in the EU is attempted, expect all hell to break loose across the European banking system as depositors in Greece, Italy, Spain, Portugal, and even France realize that as DISELBOOM openly admitted, Cyprus really was the template for bank failures going forward.

As the AP reports, the official denial is in:


Slovenian officials have a message for the world: Don’t panic — we won’t be the next to fall.
The tiny European Union member is trying to convince its people and foreign investors that it won’t be the next in line for a banking system collapse and a messy international bailout.
“We are absolutely no Cyprus,” says new Slovenian Prime Minister Alenka Bratusek. “We don’t need help. All we need is time.”

Contrary to PM Bratusek’s claims, a recent report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation claims that the equity in Slovenian state banks has been “virtually wiped out.”:

The Alpine country’s banks have been on a lending spree for years, loaning money to unprofitable state companies or privileged officials who used the cash to buy the firms they ran, using the state assets as collateral.
Many such businesses have now collapsed or have huge debts. A recent report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation says that the equity of the state banks has been “virtually wiped out.” As much as 15 percent of all loans are now non-performing, the third-highest ratio in the eurozone, the Paris-based group said.

Which brings us to the important question: Exactly how much gold does Slovenia supposedly own as its reserves that are about to be confiscated by the ECB?  3.20 tons according to Slovenia’s latest report…all likely stored in London and already rehypothecated and leased to bullion banks 1,000 times over.

Que the MSM reports that Slovenia’s 3.2 tons of gold will need to be liquidated.

Source: SilverDoctors

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